Cold frosted window with sunset behind

Cold: why collections and archives don’t much like it

Posted 5 CommentsPosted in Storage, Temperature

It’s been cold – below zero – in the UK the last few days, with days more chilly weather to come. I’m keen to have warmer weather (unless there’s snow coming, in which case bring it on) and it’s a sure thing that if you’re storing collections and archives in basements or attics, they’ll be suffering too.

Why? How can cold cause problems? I’ll use an analogy from last week. My seven year old wanted to take an inflatable plastic globe to school. We rescued it from her bedroom by the radiator and blew it up fully. We set off on foot to do the 10 minute walk in -2 degrees. After a few minutes, we noticed that it had ‘blown down’ and that the feel of it had changed – it had gone from being plump and springy to brittle and hard to move. I explained that it hadn’t blown down but that the molecFrosted window with sunset behindules of cold air within the globe and the particles of plastic in the globe had contracted in the cold, causing the blown down effect and the plastic to feel delicate. I told her to take it in to the warm classroom and see what happened and later she was able to tell me that the procedure had reversed.

Items in archives and collections react in exactly the same way to differing degrees – and there lies the problem. If you’ve two items together, say books with parchment glued onto paper or buckskin glued to card, they will expand and contract at different rates, causing loosening and tearing. Add a bit of condensation into the mix, which freezes in the layers, and you’ve got trouble heading your way – mould, mildew, shrinkage…

18 degrees is considered a stable temperature for most objects. It is worse to have daily fluctuations than seasonal ones as this causes more expansion/contraction cycles. Any area getting down to near freezing temperatures is a cause for concern. If your collection is in a poor space, consider a long term insulation plan with false walls of battens and foamboard – this will help with heating costs in the rest of the building. If you haven’t already covered windows, do so, either permanently or with blankets or thermal blinds at the windows. Allow some heating on the coldest days. Keep the area dry at all times. Consider a proper plan to look after your history and take care of your unique collections.

Museums, Libraries, Archives…and Companies?

Posted Posted in museums, libraries, archives, collections, Opinion

Museums, archives, libraries – the traditional repositories and exhibitors of history. Now, though, are company archives beginning to fill in the gaps?

In previous years, a company might maintain an archive, strictly for its own use. It might or it might not have used the archive. Whichever way, if the company shut down, or if it wanted to share knowledge, the collection would be either binned or offered to the local museum. For instance, the Lynn Museum, King’s Lynn, has representative collections from Campbell’s soup, Taylor’s seeds, and the  local glassmaking, fishing and salt industries.

Lately though, there has been bad news for museums. Councils are cutting budgets to the bone for museums that are already struggling; Walsall’s New Art Gallery is under threat; The Museum of Lancashire and the Fleetwood Museum have closed while The Tolson Museum, Dewsbury Museum and the Red House Museum are all set to close after withdrawal of funding. Many museums can’t afford to maintain their buildings, conserve their items, change their displays or conduct academic research into the collections.

At the same time, companies are getting wise to the fact that in their collections lies a diverse range of material which offers opportunities to academic, genealogy and materials researchers, display, design, marketing and publicity teams and educators, which can be used to help with the company’s CSR policy. These companies are investing in their collections and often, crucially, opening them to the public both for research and as exhibitions. When a profit can be turned, they can afford to do the things that museums increasingly cannot.

Where, then is the difference? If a company has an archivist to curate the collections, hires a display team to put them on display, employs someone to lead and teach education groups and offers public ticketed access, where does that leave museums? Will companies be able to move forward in a way that museums will not? Will companies be the new museums? Is this a positive or negative thing? I’d love to hear your thoughts.

New Year, New Strategy? Use the old to show off the new!

Posted Posted in Using archives and collections

New Year, New Strategy? Use the old to show off the new!

So 2017 is here – (a shock, I know – each year seems to move ever more swiftly the older I get). So how can we use this year in new ways? What new strategy can we adopt to show that we’re moving with the times? Ironically, to show new things, old things can often be the answer.

Look to the past
The past is the informer of the present and the future. We can look to it in myriad ways to find out what we did well and what we did badly. We can look at how we’ve changed, progressed, learned, adapted. We can see if we are reactive or proactive. We can see how we’ve dealt with challenges, from minor to major, and what effect those changes had – was it positive or negative? We can, if we look closely enough at a long company history, see the different ways that different company directors work – their differing leadership styles are written in the company’s footprint.

But why look?
Knowing what’s gone on is such a useful way of knowing how to proceed. You can evaluate a plan better if it’s been done before and failed because you can find out why it failed. You can try a plan again even if it failed last time if you know that other parameters – customer needs, changes in spending, technology – have changed too. If it’s not been done before, you know that you are the pioneer and can move in any direction you choose and this is empowering.

Where can we look?
Your company records, archives and collections are fabulous tools for evaluating your company’s future. They can tell you all of the above. Your company history can give you the confidence to lead in new and challenging directions. Perhaps this means that through your company’s past you can see the future? Maybe that’s a bit whimsical, but a new year with new hope and new ideas…anything is possible! Look to the past to think of the future and a Happy New Year to you all.

Leverage for collections – Boots the Chemists’ archives

Posted Posted in Exhibit, Using archives and collections

old-card-1348456_1280While checking LinkedIn this morning, I was attracted by an interesting image. It was a blog from Boots the Chemist with a cartoon line drawing from 1903. I saw that Boots’ Archive Department were cleverly using their archives to create an online 2016 advent calendar with a new image each day – brilliant marketing, fabulous leverage and a lovely historical way of marking the passage of time – not only of this year but of their years as a company.

 

The image showed a sign pointing to Boots where one could find ‘cash and chemist’ and a van driving through the snow. The van was advertising Boots’ Christmas Card Department and the strapline was for  ‘Christmas cards, comics, books, toy books and calendars’. Although Boots sells all of these things today, it’s not what the shop is known for. This gives us an interesting historical perspective and leads to questions about their marketing and sales choices over the years; why they chose to sell or not to sell specific items; what worked well for them at this time and what works well for them now; the changing customer needs over the years. Looking at something like this is a way of evaluating company success and change over time.

 

Why don’t more people do this? Why is this seen as ‘a bit out there’? Surely it’s both a great way of reminiscing about a company, its products and what they mean as well as a fabulous way of promoting a company in a subtle way? What could you to leverage your company history and create client engagement in a similar way?

 

Here’s the first page link www.linkedin.com/hp/update/6211494794460426240 ;